IOE EPrints

Puppets Promoting Engagement and Talk in Science

Simon, Shirley and Naylor, Stuart and Keogh, Brenda and Maloney, Jane and Downing, Brigid (2008) Puppets Promoting Engagement and Talk in Science. International Journal of Science Education, 30 (9). pp. 1229-1248. ISSN 0950-0693

[img]
Preview
PDF (SimonNaylore2008Puppets1229.pdf)
SimonNaylore2008Puppets1229.pdf - Other

Download (187Kb) | Preview

Abstract

Research into classroom interactions has shown that talk that promotes reasoning can help children in their learning of science. Such talk can only be generated when teachers are willing to take a dialogic approach that is stimulating and provides opportunities for children to articulate their ideas. This research set out to determine whether the use of large puppets would help teachers to change the nature of their whole class discourse to enhance children's talk and engagement in science. The study was carried out with 16 teachers of children aged 7 to 11 years in schools in London and Manchester, UK. Through adopting a mixture of research methods, including classroom observation and teacher and child interviews, the research provides evidence that the use of puppets significantly increases the amount of teacher discourse oriented towards reasoning and argument, and decreases the amount of talk that focuses on recall. Through the puppets, teachers also use more narrative to set the science in stimulating contexts, and encourage children in their contributions to whole class discussion. Interview data also show the positive effects of puppets on children's motivation and engagement in science. The findings have led to further major funding for professional development in the use of puppets in the UK, and research into the reasons why the use of puppets is so effective.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Empirical study involving classroom observations, teacher and child interviews. This was an innovative piece of research and entirely new in the field. S.Simon will be submitting this publication The findings provide insights about the potential of using puppets in science lessons as the puppets have an impact on the nature of the discourse in the classroom, the engagement and interest of children and on teachers’ beliefs and practices. The research was funded by the Nuffield Foundation. A substantial programme of continuing professional development for teachers has been funded to provide schools with the puppets and teaching resources alongside training for teachers in using the puppets in science lessons. Research basis/rigour A total of 20 teachers were involved in the project. Teachers were observed teaching, they kept reflective diaries and were interviewed about the impact of the puppets in their lessons. A total of 51 children were interviewed about their views on the puppets in science lessons. Article peer reviewed by 2 international referees Contribution SS 80% JM 10% Abstract Present This is an electronic version of an article published in Simon, Shirley and Naylor, Stuart and Keogh, Brenda and Maloney, Jane and Downing, Brigid (2008) Puppets Promoting Engagement and Talk in Science. International Journal of Science Education, 30 (9). pp. 1229-1248. International Journal of Science Education is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/09500690701474037
Divisions: IOE Departments > Departments > Geography, Enterprise, Mathematics and Science
IOE Departments > Departments > Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment
Depositing User: IOE Repository Editor (2)
Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2009 15:42
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2013 12:00
URI: http://eprints.ioe.ac.uk/id/eprint/661
View Item View Item