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Teaching in Hong Kong: Professionalization, Accountability and the State

Morris, Paul (2004) Teaching in Hong Kong: Professionalization, Accountability and the State. Research Papers in Education, 19 (1). pp. 105-121. ISSN 0267-1522

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Abstract

This article traces the processes for encouraging and/or ensuring the accountability of teachers in Hong Kong. It is argued that, if examined historically, the nature of teacher accountability has been determined by the government, whose approach has been ambivalent and paradoxical. Up until the mid 1980s, through inertia and nondecisions, the government maintained the low level of professionalization of teaching. Subsequently, from the late 1980s onwards, it resisted and diluted attempts by the professional community to regulate itself. Most recently it has actively sought to introduce systems to allow the government to scrutinize teachers in an ostensible attempt to promote the level of teacher professionalism. These changes are analysed in terms of the differences between professionalism and professionalization, and with reference to the government’s own legitimacy and the changing political context.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an electronic version of an article published in Morris, Paul (2004) Teaching in Hong Kong: Professionalization, Accountability and the State. Research Papers in Education, 19 (1). pp. 105-121. Research Papers in Education is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/0267152032000177007
Divisions: IOE Departments > Departments > Continuing and Professional Education
IOE Departments > Departments > Lifelong and Comparative Education
Depositing User: IOE Repository Editor (2)
Date Deposited: 17 May 2010 16:27
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2013 11:58
URI: http://eprints.ioe.ac.uk/id/eprint/4752

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