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Triadic Dialogue in Oral Communication Tasks: what are the implications for language learning?

Radford, Julie and Ireson, Judith and Mahon, Merle (2006) Triadic Dialogue in Oral Communication Tasks: what are the implications for language learning? Language and Education, 20 (3). pp. 191-210. ISSN 0950-0782

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Abstract

Asymmetry in classroom discourse, typified by teachers’ frequent use of inauthentic initiating question turns, does not afford the best opportunities for the learning of language skills. More favourable conditions would appear to be associated with collaborative discourse patterns that display genuine interest in the child’s contribution and build on, and respond to, the child’s turn. Video-recordings were made of consecutive episodes of ‘story-writing’, ‘speaking book’ and ‘circle-time’ activities to explore the sequential implications of the teachers’ initiations across each task. During speaking book the teacher initiates with topic initial elicitors which invite news, ideas or opinions from the child. In story-writing the teacher employs invitations, which call for the children to generate ideas or suggestions. Analysis of teacher follow-up turns demonstrates ways in which they recast and reformulate the children’s response turns and elicit further material related to the pupils’ agendas. By contrast, there is limited evidence of negotiation in the circle-time activity. The study demonstrates the potentially facilitative role played by triadic dialogue in language learning and therefore has professional significance for all those involved in the development of oral language skills in classrooms.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Re-evaluates the discourse analysis approach to the study of classroom interaction. Demonstrates the contribution of conversation analysis, a cutting-edge methodology, to interpreting the work done by turns at atlk during oral classroom activities. Contrbutes new theory about the learning of language for children with speech and language needs. This is an electronic version of an article published in Radford, Julie and Ireson, Judith and Mahon, Merle (2006) Triadic Dialogue in Oral Communication Tasks: what are the implications for language learning? Language and Education, 20 (3). pp. 191-210. Language and Education is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/09500780608668723
Controlled Keywords: Special educational needs; Linguistics; Language; Teaching methods; classroom discourse, language learning, language disability
Divisions: IOE Departments > Departments > Psychology and Human Development
Depositing User: IOE Repository Editor (2)
Date Deposited: 08 Jul 2009 15:23
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2013 11:42
URI: http://eprints.ioe.ac.uk/id/eprint/390
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