IOE EPrints

Developing historical and metahistorical thinking in history classrooms: : reflections on research and practice in England

Chapman, Arthur (2015) Developing historical and metahistorical thinking in history classrooms: : reflections on research and practice in England. Diálogos, 19 (1). pp. 29-55. ISSN 14159945. DOI doi: 10.4025/dialogos.v19i1.1076

Full text not available from this repository.
Official URL: http://www.uem.br/dialogos/index.php?journal=ojs&p...

Abstract

The history of history education, past and present, often resembles a history of contestation, in which rival and polarized understandings of the meanings of 'history' and 'history education' vie for dominance (Nakou and Barca, 2010). A common polarity in debates on history curricula is the opposition between 'knowledge' and 'skill', an opposition that has had considerable currency in recent curriculum reform processes in England which have emphasised 'core knowledge' (DfE, 2013). Drawing on examples of classroom practice (Chapman, 2003; Woodcock, 2005; Buxton, 2003) and on systematic research and theorizing (Shemilt, 1983; Lee and Shemilt, 2009) this paper aims to destabilize such binary talk and to explore the ways in which 'first order' knowledge and understanding about the past and 'second order' or metahistorical knowledge and understanding of how the discipline of history works are both logically inter-related and inseparable in practical terms. The notion of historical 'enquiry' (Counsell, 2011) is explored as a pedagogic tool for the simultaneous development of these inter-related dimensions of historical thinking.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Atira Pure
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2015 09:38
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2015 09:38
View Item View Item