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The effect of Phase One training on young recruits' personal and professional development in the British army

Swain, Jon (2015) The effect of Phase One training on young recruits' personal and professional development in the British army. Journal of Youth Studies. pp. 1-18. ISSN 1367-6261. DOI 10.1080/13676261.2015.1039965

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Abstract

This paper focuses on young men in the British army and their attitudes towards, and experiences of, Phase One basic training. The research, which took place in 2008–2011, used a longitudinal design. Using mixed methods, the findings draw on qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with 26 young trainees, and interviews and quantitative survey data with 1518 recruits, with an average age of 19.6 years. It reports on recruits’ motivations for enlisting and then tells a story of socialisation, transition and change from both civilian to soldier and from adolescent to man. Drawing on Goffman's theory of the ‘total institution’ the research is centred around two contexts – the outside training ranges and the indoor barracks. It argues that the army has a set of highly effective structures and processes that socialise individuals into the culture of the military organisation. By the time they pass out of Phase One training, recruits are in the possession of a set of norms, values, knowledge and skills, and have not only been transformed into competent members of the military organisation, but have also begun to take on and construct new forms of self-image and identity.

Item Type: Article
Controlled Keywords: Masculinities, Identities, Armed Forces, training
Depositing User: Atira Pure
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2015 09:38
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2015 09:38
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