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The relationship between qualitative and quantitative research: Lessons from feminist psychology

Phoenix, Ann and Griffin, C (1994) The relationship between qualitative and quantitative research: Lessons from feminist psychology. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 4 (4). pp. 287-298.

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Abstract

The dominant methodological approach in psychological research has involved the use of quantitative methods within a positivist framework. In this article we argue that both qualitative and quantitative methods have their strengths and limitations, depending on the research question under investigation. We examine some of the advantages of qualitative methods, paying particular attention to the value of such methods for feminist researchers. We challenge the positivist assumption that all research should be apolitical and value-free, arguing that the political context in which all research studies take place plays an important role in decisions about the appropriate research methods to use. Despite the value attached to qualitative methods by feminist researchers, there may be projects for which quantitative methods, or a combination of qualitative and quantitative techniques, are more suitable. We draw on examples from our research on the transition from school to the job market for young people, and a study of 16- to 19-year-old first time mothers to illustrate these points, examining the practical implications of our arguments for applied social psychology research

Item Type: Article
Divisions: IOE Departments > Departments > Thomas Coram Research Unit
Depositing User: Atira Pure
Date Deposited: 01 Jun 2013 02:02
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2015 08:58
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