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Teachers developing assessment for learning: impact on student achievement

Wiliam, Dylan and Lee, Clare and Harrison, Christine and Black, Paul (2004) Teachers developing assessment for learning: impact on student achievement. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy and Practice, 11 (1). pp. 49-65. ISSN 0969-594X

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Abstract

While it is generally acknowledged that increased use of formative assessment (or assessment for learning) leads to higher quality learning, it is often claimed that the pressure in schools to improve the results achieved by students in externally-set tests and examinations precludes its use. This paper reports on the achievement of secondary school students who worked in classrooms where teachers made time to develop formative assessment strategies. A total of 24 teachers (2 science and 2 mathematics teachers, in each of six schools in two LEAs) were supported over a six-month period in exploring and planning their approach to formative assessment, and then, beginning in September 1999, the teachers put these plans into action with selected classes. In order to compute effect sizes, a measure of prior attainment and at least one comparison group was established for each class (typically either an equivalent class taught in the previous year by the same teacher, or a parallel class taught by another teacher). The mean effect size was 0.32.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This paper describes the empirical results of a study of the impact of teacher professional development on student achievement. It is important both substantively and methodologically. Substantively it is one of a very few studies that evaluates teacher professional development in terms of its impact on student achievement, and is an important confirmation that the principles of formative assessment raise student achievement in real, messy settings, over extended periods of time, and when student achievement is measured on standardized assessments. Methodologically, it is innovative because it provides an approach to aggregating data from different teachers within the same intervention, even if they focus their work on students of different ages, and where achievement is measured in a variety of ways. Paul Holland, one of the world’s foremost social statisticians, coined the term “poly-experiment” to describe this study, and endorsed the approach as the only practicable approach in the circumstances. This is an electronic version of an article published in Wiliam, Dylan and Lee, Clare and Harrison, Christine and Black, Paul (2004) Teachers developing assessment for learning: impact on student achievement. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy and Practice, 11 (1). pp. 49-65. Assessment in Education is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/0969594042000208994
Depositing User: IOE Repository Editor (2)
Date Deposited: 03 Mar 2010 12:12
Last Modified: 13 May 2014 17:01
URI: http://eprints.ioe.ac.uk/id/eprint/1131
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