IOE EPrints

Examining the effect of class size on classroom engagement and teacher-pupil interaction : differences in relation to pupil prior attainment and primary vs. secondary schools

Blatchford, Peter and Bassett, Paul and Brown, Penelope (2011) Examining the effect of class size on classroom engagement and teacher-pupil interaction : differences in relation to pupil prior attainment and primary vs. secondary schools. Learning and Instruction, 21 (6). pp. 715-730. ISSN 0959-4752. DOI UNSPECIFIED

Full text not available from this repository.
SFX image for help Not from UCL IOE? image for help
Item Type: Article
Additional Information: It is now recognised by many that we need to know more about effects of class size on classroom interactions and pupil behaviour. This paper, in a prestigious international recognized Journal extends previous research in several ways through : 1. it compares effects on two main types of behaviours – pupil classroom engagement and teacher to pupil interaction; 2. it examines if effects vary by pupil attainment level; 3. it examines effects of class size on classroom processes across the whole of the primary and secondary school years (there has been next to no previous research on secondary schools); and 4. it uses systematic observation data to capture effects of class size on moment by moment behaviours and employs sophisticated multilevel statistical analyses that controls for possibly confounding factors and deals with the clustered nature of observation data. The research design and methods of data collection make this one of the largest and most rigorous studies in the field. Results showed that as class sizes became smaller there were more times when pupils were the focus of a teacher’s attention, and engaged in active interaction with teachers. It was also found that pupils’ classroom engagement decreased in larger classes and this problem was particularly marked for the pupils who are already attaining at lower levels. This, in turn, was accompanied by teachers seeking to control low attainers more than other groups in larger classes. The paper reports on findings first presented at the 2008 AERA annual conference, which was the most covered story from the conference in the USA media that week. The policy implications have been taken on board several countries, including Canada and Hong Kong (which has elected to introduce reduced class sizes at primary level). It is concluded that small classes can be a valuable educational initiative right through school, but could be particularly targeted at lower attaining pupils at secondary level.
Divisions: IOE Departments > Departments > Psychology and Human Development
Depositing User: Atira Pure
Date Deposited: 02 Oct 2013 10:27
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2015 08:51
View Item View Item